Good Reads

“Men read by way of revenge.” – Thomas Paine

My Recommendations:

  • The Road to Serfdom, F.A. Hayek
    • Hayek explains how Nazi Germany happened, and it is not as most assume.  This book is a warning for all social planners.
  • I and Thou, Martin Buber
    • Deeply simple, Buber’s philosophical signature is a triumph of empathy and compassion.
  • Common Sense, Thomas Paine
    • The booklet that made America.
  • Rights of Man, Thomas Paine
    • Perhaps reason’s greatest manifestation against tyranny.
  • 1984, George Orwell
    • No one should get out of high shool without reading this book.  Frighteningly starting to come true, just a few decades later than Orwell anticipated.
  • Atlas Shrugged, Ayn Rand
    • “Who is John Galt?”  Rand teaches us that the “human element” of corporation is self-destructive, bringing to mind different issues at different times, i.e., carbon credits today.
  • Animal Farm, George Orwell
    • This allegory clarifies the appeal of socialism, revealing it as totalitarian.
  • Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human, Harold Bloom
    • What are we without Shakespeare?  I hope we never learn.
  • Illusions, Richard Bach
    • This book is a reset button.  When life seems too much to handle, read this to refresh your perspective.
  • A History of Western Philosophy, Bertrand Russell
    • Explores history’s why.
  • The Myth of the Robber Barons, Burton Folsom
    • A fresh look at the supposedly evil capitalistic emperors of American history.
  • Human Action, Ludwig von Mises
    • The big book of how the market actually works on a human level.
  • Blowback, Chalmers Johnson
    • Explains how foreign interventionism builds hatred toward the U.S.
  • Walden, H. David Thoreau
    • Learn what it means to live deliberately.
  • All the Shah’s Men, Stephen Kinzer
    • The politically incorrect (but true) history of U.S. – Iranian relations.
  • The Creature from Jekyll Island, G. Edward Griffin
    • On the curious founding of the Federal Reserve.
  • The End of America, Naomi Wolf
    • Ten steps to closing down an open society.  This is compelling and frightening.
  • The Law, Frederic Bastiat
    • The classic blueprint for a just society
  • The Discovery of Freedom, Rose Wilder Lane
    • A look at history as the story of mankind’s struggle against authority
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    One Response

    1. Good list. 1984 and Animal Farm go well with Brave New World. Where 1984 details in-your-face totalitarianism, Brave New World shows us the soft kind that people end up demanding.

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